The answer you need may only be a click away...

Please see the below most common questions about your service and repair needs.  If you have a question that is not listed below, please contact us.

  • 1Do you need new tires?

     

    You need to be aware of three things when deciding if you need new tires: tread wear, exposure to the elements and tire age.

    TREAD WEAR 
    Who says a penny doesn't buy you anything? With this test, a penny can buy you peace of mind when it comes to your tires and safety. Place a penny head first into several tread grooves across the tire. If you always see the top of Lincoln's head, your treads are shallow and worn. If this is the case, your tires need to be replaced. If part of Lincoln's head is always covered by the tread, you have more than 2/32 of an inch of tread depth remaining. This means you probably don't need new tires.

    WHY WORRY ABOUT TREAD WEAR? 
    The most important reason to worry about tread wear is safety. When your tire treads are worn, your car may respond poorly in adverse weather conditions like rain and snow. With good treads your car will grip the road better. Also, having insufficient tread is considered illegal in many states. And finally, worn treads can make other parts of your car wear prematurely.

    EXPOSURE TO THE ELEMENTS 
    Exposure to heat and the sun's ultraviolet rays may cause structural changes to your tires. These changes are not usually a concern in moderate climates.

    TIRE AGE 
    How old are your tires? Regardless of tread wear, vehicle manufacturers generally recommend you replace your tires at six years. Most tire manufacturers recommend you replace your tires at 10 years. Check the manufacturer's recommendations of your specific tires.

    I NEED NEW TIRES 
    When it's time to change your tires, All American Automotive & Tire wants to make purchasing a new set as simple as possible. We have the best selection of quality tires to fit your vehicle, your budget and your driving style. From economy to ultra high performance tires in the size you need from brands you trust.

     

  • 2Is it time for brake service?

     

    There are several warning signs that your vehicle can give you before your brakes may reach the point of potential failure or extensive repair. Simply using your sense of hearing, sight and touch may alert you to a potential problem. Here are some of the common questions you should ask yourself concerning your vehicle's brake system:

    Does your brake warning light come on when you are driving?

    Is your brake fluid low? Does it appear very dirty?

    Do you hear a grinding sound or a squealing sound when you apply the brake pedal?

    Do you feel a pulsation or some sponginess in the brake pedal when it is depressed?

    Does your vehicle steer or pull to one side when braking?

     

  • 3Replacing Two Tires?

     

    Generally, new tires provide increased resistance to hydroplaning due to their full tread depth. With new tires on the rear, an oversteer skidding condition may be more easily avoided. W

    hether your vehicle is front, rear, or all-wheel drive, if your rear tires lose traction because of hydroplaning on a wet road, an oversteer skidding condition may result and lead to loss of control, particularly in a turn.

    Additional or alternate recommendations may apply for some vehicles. Always refer to and follow the vehicle's manufacturer's tire replacement and tire application recommendations; consult your vehicle owner's manual and tire information placard.

    Driving your vehicle with an improper mix of tires is dangerous. Your vehicle's handling characteristics can be seriously affected. You could have an accident resulting in serious personal injury or death. Consult your vehicle owner's manual, tire information placard, and a qualified service professional for proper tire replacement.

     

  • 4What is a load index?

     

    The load index indicates the load-carrying capacity of a tire. In other words, it tells you how much weight your tire can support. For example, if a tire has a load index of 92, it can support 1,389 pounds at maximum air pressure. Multiply that by four tires (4 x 1,389 = 5,556 pounds) to get your car's maximum load-carrying capacity. Never install tires with a lower load carrying capacity than the tires originally installed on your car in the factory.

     

    Load
    Index
    Load
    (lbs)
    Load
    Index
    Load
    (lbs)
    Load
    Index
    Load
    (lbs)
    0 99 50 419 100 1764
    1 102 51 430 101 1819
    2 105 52 441 102 1874
    3 107 53 454 103 1929
    4 110 54 467 104 1984
    5 114 55 481 105 2039
    6 117 56 494 106 2094
    7 120 57 507 107 2149
    8 123 58 520 108 2205
    9 128 59 536 109 2271
    10 132 60 551 110 2337
    11 136 61 567 111 2403
    12 139 62 584 112 2469
    13 143 63 600 113 2535
    14 148 64 617 114 2601
    15 152 65 639 115 2679
    16 157 66 639 116 2756
    17 161 67 677 117 2833
    18 165 68 694 118 2910
    19 171 69 716 119 2998
    20 176 70 739 120 3086
    21 182 71 761 121 3197
    22 187 72 783 122 3307
    23 193 73 805 123 3417
    24 198 74 827 124 3527
    25 204 75 852 125 3638
    26 209 76 882 126 3748
    27 215 77 908 127 3858
    28 220 78 937 128 3968
    29 227 79 963 129 4079
    30 234 80 992 130 4189
    31 240 81 1019 131 4289
    32 247 82 1047 132 4409
    33 254 83 1074 133 4541
    34 260 84 1102 134 4674
    35 267 85 1135 135 4806
    36 276 86 1168 136 4938
    37 282 87 1201 137 5071
    38 291 88 1235 138 5203
    39 300 89 1279 139 5357
    40 309 90 1323 140 5512
    41 320 91 1356 141 5677
    42 331 92 1389 142 5842
    43 342 93 1433 143 6008
    44 353 94 1477 144 6173
    45 364 95 1521 145 6393
    46 375 96 1565 146 6614
    47 386 97 1609 147 6779
    48 397 98 1653 148 6844
    49 408 99 1709 149 7165
            150 7385
     

     

  • 5What is a TPMS?

     

    TPMS, or the Tire Pressure Monitoring System, is an electronic system that alerts you with a dashboard indicator light when your car's tire pressure falls to the point of needing inflation.

     

     

  • 6What is meant by speed rating?

     

    The speed rating of a tire indicates the speed category (or range of speeds) at which the tire can carry a load under specified service conditions. The speed rating system used today was developed in Europe in response to the need to control the safe performance of tires at standardized speeds. A letter from A to Z symbolized a tire's certified speed rating, ranging from 5 km/h (3 mph) to above 300 km/h (186 mph). This rating system, listed below, describes the top speed for which a tire is certified. It does not indicate the total performance capability of a tire.

    When this speed rating system was originally developed, the Unlimited V category of over 210 km/h (130 mph) was the top speed rating a tire could achieve.

    As manufacturers made more tires that did not fit this category, it was necessary to better regulate performance at standardized speeds to ensure safety. The Limited V category of 250 km/h (149 mph) was then created, and the Z speed rating was added as the top speed rating that a tire could achieve. W and Y limited speed symbols have been added as higher speed categories.

    Always consult the manufacturer for the maximum speed of Unlimited Z tires. Speed rating is identified as a part of the tire's sizing or service description.

    In the latest attempt to standardize tire designations, all ratings except Unlimited ZR incorporate the speed symbol and load index as the tire's service description. For example:

     

    205/60R15 91V
    205 = Section Width in Millimeters
    60 = Aspect Ratio
    R = Radial Construction
    15 = Rim Diameter in Inches
    91 = Load Index (Service
    Description)
    V = Speed Symbol

     

    When "ZR" appears in the size designation with the service description, the maximum speed is as indicated by the service description:

     

    EXAMPLES

    Tire Designation

    Maximum Speed

    P275/40ZR17 93W 270 km/h (168 mph)
    P275/40ZR17 93Y 300 km/h (186 mph)

     

    For tires having a maximum speed capability above (240 km/h (149 mph), a "ZR" may appear in the size designation.

    For tires having a maximum speed capability above 300 km/h (186 mph), a "ZR" must appear in the size designation.

    Consult the tire manufacturer for maximum speed when there is no service description.

     

    SPEED SYMBOLS

    Speed
    Symbol
    Speed
    (km/h)
    Speed
    (mph)
    A1 5 3
    A2 10 6
    A3 15 9
    A4 20 12
    A5 25 16
    A6 30 19
    A8 40 25
    B 50 31
    C 60 37
    D 65 40
    E 70 43
    F 80 50
    G 90 56
    J 100 62
    K 110 68
    L 120 75
    M 130 81
    N 140 87
    P 150 94
    Q 160 100
    R 170 106
    S 180 112
    T 190 118
    U 200 124
    H 210 130
    V 240 149
    W 270 168
    Y 300 186

     

     

  • 7What is the difference between maintenance and repairs?

     

    Repairs are services that are required or necessary when something on your vehicle is not working properly. Also, when your vehicle has worn to the point where a replacement is required to maintain the performance of your vehicle.

    Maintenance is the routinely scheduled services, inspections and part replacements that your vehicle manufacturer recommends based on the age or mileage of your vehicle.

    The schedule for performing these maintenance services varies from vehicle to vehicle. You will find the schedule for your vehicle in your owner's manual. Following this schedule is the best way to make sure your vehicle is performing as it should.

     

  • 8When is it time for a tune-up?

     

    It may be time for a "tune-up" if you notice one or more of the conditions below when starting or driving your vehicle:

    • a decrease in gas mileage
    • a noticeable loss in power
    • your engine running "rough" or stalling when at a stop
    • engine "knocking" when accelerating or running-on after the ignition is turned off
    • your "Check Engine" or "Service Engine" light remaining on after initial start

     

  • 9Why is Air Pressure important?

     

    Keeping the correct air pressure in your tires helps your tires last longer, helps your car handle better and safer, and helps you save money.

    CHECK AIR PRESSURE REGULARLY 
    Most people forget about their tires until something goes wrong. The truth is, tires lose pressure daily. In cool weather, a tire will typically lose one or two pounds of air per month. in warm weather, tires lose even more air. That's why it's recommended that you check air pressure every other time you stop to fill up your gas tank. Keep in mind that many vehicles have different pressures on the front and rear axle. And don't forget to check the pressure in your spare tire.

    WHAT IS THE CORRECT PRESSURE? 
    The first place to look for the correct air pressure for your specific tires is your vehicle owner's manual. Correct air pressure should also be listed on the tire placard attached to the vehicle door edge, doorpost, glove box door or fuel door.